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to be weak due to worries about the fiscal cliff. with $600 billion in automatic tax hikes and government spending cuts set to start next yer, why aren't more firms postponing hiring decisions? >> what we're hearing from businesses is that it is really hard to actually pull back hiring right now, because they've already fired so many workers, gotten so lean that it's really difficult. >> reporter: but not all the surprises in the report were good. at 7.7%, the unemployment rate hit its lowest level since december 2008. but that was mostly due to people giving up their search for work. and there's another disappointing trend, weak wage growth. >> what we are not seeing is strong income generation. the slowing in wage gains-- the weak bargaining power of labor comes across in this report and >> reporter: so although the labor market is not getting worse, it's not getting a lot better, either. and there are plenty of risks that could cause businesses to cancel projects, and hiring plans. >> clearly one of the biggest risks is that we don't see a deal on the fiscal cliff, or that they drag it
the country, i think this whole issue around taxes and around the fiscal cliff generally leads to something else, which is significant uncertainty. and whether it is delaware or whether it is any other state, one of the things that is most important to us is having business leaders have some kind of certainty about what the ground rules are going to be. not just for the next three months, by the way. but really for the next several years. they're more likely to invest, more likely to hire their next employee if they know what the game looks like. what the landscape looks like. and so as much as anything else, we think having that certainty, having that clarity on taxes and spending, is really important. >> susie: you said you are also very concerned about where growth is going to come from. did you discuss that with the president, won did he say, aside from tax increases and spending cuts? >> one of the things we specifically talked about was infrastructure. it didn't used to be that roads and bridges were democrat or republican. we need to continue to invest in our infrastructure, a strong
concerned about what the economic impact could be of going over the fiscal cliff. again, taxes going up on middle-class americans. some industry potentially coming to a standstill. so underlying everything else in our state is growth. if the economy is not growing, in fact, if it is contracting, it will be bad for tax receipts, and it will be bad because it means fewer people working. that's a critically important piece of it. the second thing is making sure as these negotiations take place, the impact on states, on local governments, on our citizens, is carefully considered. >> susie: governor markell, thec s thank you so muh for coming on the program. >> thank you. >> tom: from a governor's take, we now turn to the view from the private sector. some of the nation's leading c.e.o.s have banded together with deficit commission co- chairs erskine bowles and alan simpson to launch the "fix the debt" campaign. darren gersh spoke with maya macguineas, one of the organizers of the campaign. darren began by asking her if the business leaders are making a difference. >> i think the whole campa
the estate tax is just too complicated to tackle in the fiscal cliff negotiations. >> if we get to a comprehensive reform of the tax system and we say, "okay, here is the income tax. this is what we are going to do. now, we need an estate tax to back it up," maybe you could change the estate tax in that setting. but just one off, i think that's hard to do. >> reporter: if congress doesn't act soon, the current $5 million estate tax exemption will fall to $1 million on january 1, though it is unlikely to stay there for long. darren gersh, nbr, washington. >> susie: the fiscal cliff was certainly one topic on the agenda of the federal reserve today as policymakers kicked off their two-day meeting. tomorrow, the world will be waiting to see whether the central bank will do more to prop up the u.s. economy. the big question is whether the fed will stick with its so- called "operation twist" bond- buying program, or will it announce something new? erika miller takes a closer look at what's expected. >> reporter: the fed may announce a new twist in its bond buying plans, but that does
with no agreement to avoid the fiscal cliff. economists warn that if higher taxes and less government spending go into effect for many months next year, the u.s. could sink back into recession. so expect reporter questions on that topic at the fed's question and answer session after the policy announcement. >> he's going to reiterate to politicians to get their acts together for some sort of long-term deficit reduction plan. >> reporter: the stock market often rises when the fed announces economic stulus measures. but that may not happen tomorrow. some experts think the overhang of the fiscal cliff will likely dampen investor enthusiasm. erika miller, nbr, new york. >> tom: the latest economic statistics the federal reserve can consider is the october trade balance, with american importing a record amount of stuff from china. that increased our trade deficit to $42.2 billion. u.s. exports fell 3.6%, the biggest drop in almost four years. imports also fell, down 2.1% to the lowe in month n ll street,he dow gained 78, the nasdaq rose 44, the s& up nine. >> susie: our next guest says the fed's stim
're thinking with increased taxes, because of the fiscal cliff, if the worst happens, consumer demand is just going to fall off. they are already ting action today to try to prepare for that eventuality. but the consumer is kind of blankly ignoring this, and confidence is up for really lots of reasons. i mean, the net worth of households has been repaired. about two-thirds of it has come back as house prices rise and stock prices are now double what they were at the bottom in march of '09. when you look at state and local budgets, they're now much better with revenue rising. so theayof and budget cuts, we think are waning, if not over. housing is clearly coming back. things are improving and consumer confidence reflects that. >> tom: but there is that dark cloud of the fiscal cliff. you mentioned it earlier, businesses planning for consumer confidence to go off that cliff if we go off it as a country. do you not agree with that prospect? >> well, no. i believe it will -- if nothing happens and there is no agreement, i think there will be a mild, kind of technical recession in the first half o
cliff related selling as shareholders worries that capital gains tax rates will be higher next year. >> still, financial planner sharon appleman says selling stock solely for tax reasons isn't the best idea. >> i definitely think it's a legitimate concern and can be an opportunity. and i would say if somebody was interested in reducing a physician any-- position anyway, that can certainly be a great time to do it, you know, why pay higher taxes in a few months time when you can pay a lower tax now. >> reporter: and some analysts say, before unloading the shares, consider that fundamentals for apple haven't really changed. sure, revenue growth may slow and margins may contract, and there are worries the tech giant will have trouble fending off competition from increasingly popular android products. but, to some analysts, the shares look especially cheap today, especially considering their move south since the september high. >> we think the smart phone trend is still in the early to middle innings and is not in the late innings yet. so we think, to the extent that apple can maintain
of the arguments we hear from some democrats is that the fiscal cliff isn't really a cliff, it's more like a slope and you could gradually go down it and the withholding from tax wouldn't kick in for a while and the spending cuts wouldn't hurt the economy for a while. do you think it is good idea to go over the deliver and it is more of a slope. >> no, i think would be a mistake to go over the fiscal cliff because it could set in motion lots of things that could be a drag on the economy. that being said, i think if it's clear that the parties were working toward a negotiation, that you could spill into january without doing any irreversible damage. >> one of the ideas that seems to now be on the table is this idea of moving to a more accurate measure of inflation and using that to adjust social security benefits and tax brackets. is that something you could support in. >> well, i have two concerns with that. one is the general issue about dealing with social security in the context of these deficit reduction talks. because social security is fully solvent until the year 2033. after that point it w
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)